World Water Week 2015

23.08.15 - 28.08.15

World-Water-Week-2015World Water Week in Stockholm is the annual focal point for the globe’s water issues. It is organized by SIWI. This year is the jubilee year for both the Week and the Stockholm Water Prize. The theme is Water for Development. In 2014, over 3,000 individuals and 270 convening organizations from 143 countries participated in the Week.

Experts, practitioners, decision-makers, business innovators and young professionals from a range of sectors and countries come to Stockholm to network, exchange ideas, foster new thinking and develop solutions to the most pressing water-related challenges of today. We believe water is key to our future prosperity, and that together, we can achieve a water wise world.

2015 is the target year for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Although considerable progress has been made, the targets to achieve improved access to key basic services during the first 15 years of this century will not be fully reached. About one billion people will still lack access to safe water and even more lack access to basic sanitation. About one billion people will still be without electricity and will go to bed hungry – largely the same underprivileged poor.

The challenge remains for the world community in 2015, to formulate, commit to and to urgently pursue a new set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Water is central to these challenges. Our lives and livelihoods, and that of all other living creatures, depend on water. Without it we cannot sustain a productive economy, live healthy lives or produce food, energy and other basic necessities and commodities.

World Water Week in Stockholm will continue to focus on these issues, and the vital role water plays in addressing them. From “water and food security” in 2012, “water cooperation” in 2013 and “water and energy” in 2014, we look forward to highlighting the importance of “water for development” in 2015.

The programme of 2015 World Water Week consist of over 160 events and 8 workshops. During the 90-minute events, the most relevant topics relating to “Water for Development” will be discussed – i.e. Financing, SDGs, Integrity, Gender issues, Climate Change, Energy, Sanitation, Food, Conflict Resolution, Water Management…

Download the pdf version of the programme or visit the online programme website to find out more about the topics that will be covered during World Water Week.

More information: www.worldwaterweek.org

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